Carmel Indiana Pool Construction

carmel indiana pool open during construction

A Study in Contrasts

Contrasts always catch my eye. Whether it’s contrasts in tone, color or subject matter, I like to find ways to document them with my camera. This post examines the contrasts at a new Carmel, Indiana pool.

Pool Open During Construction

Our neighborhood has a new pool this year and the area around it is still under construction. This gave me a chance to shoot a lot of those contrasts that I like.

There’s the bright blue water and colorful swimsuits next to the expanse of dirt. Another contrast is the smoothness of the water and new concrete against the footprints left by construction equipment. And the most obvious contrast to me is the shiny, sparkling new pool set against the completely raw, unfinished site around it.

carmel indiana pool open during construction
carmel indiana pool open during construction
carmel indiana pool open during construction
carmel indiana pool open during construction
carmel indiana pool open during construction
carmel indiana pool open during construction
carmel indiana pool open during construction

Construction Noise

On this day there’s a hard-to-miss a bulldozer circling the pool. The rumbling of a diesel engine, the crunch of dirt and rock, plus the squeak of the metal tracks provides an interesting contrast against the splashing and yelling of children. Below is a video clip I shot on my iPhone. Turn on the sound to get an idea of what it feels like to be there.

carmel indiana pool open during construction

Related Posts

Thanks for checking out my photos of construction at a Carmel, Indiana pool. Here are some family activity posts you’ll want to check out.

A Delicious Medium

Today we present a photo story of a young artist discovering a delicious medium. One of the many benefits of working from home when you have four (and soon five) kids who homeschool is witnessing, and subsequently documenting, their shenanigans.

This is what happens when you leave a tempting item on the kitchen counter within reach of a toddler. A new photo story!

chocolate syrup art toddler carmel indiana
chocolate syrup art toddler carmel indiana
chocolate syrup art toddler carmel indiana

It’s All Good

Photo by Courtney McCracken

We believe that children are inherently good. They’re curious about the world around them and are naturally inclined to explore and experiment. When messes happen, we laugh, take some photos and then clean up together.

Related Content

If you like these slice-of-life photo stories, be sure to check us out on Instagram. We also have a new Facebook page.

Also, here are some more stories on family exploration.

Happy Birthday, America!

One of the things I enjoy most about shooting this time of year is the diversity of people that come out to celebrate America’s independence.  It’s a great reminder that we all love this country and we all are welcome here.

Here’s a slideshow of some of our favorite images celebrating America…

A handful of these images are available to order as prints on our online shop. 20% of proceeds will benefit Exodus Refugee Immigration in Indianapolis.

For more patriotic inspiration, check these out:

Refugees in Indiana

Carmelfest

Christkindlmarkt

This past weekend was the grand opening of the Carmel Christkindlmarkt.  I stopped by on Sunday evening to check out the scene.  It’s a beautiful setup with the Palladium in the background.  The iceskating is affordable, and there are special deals on Wednesday and Thursday, so be sure to check out the website for details:  https://www.carmelchristkindlmarkt.com

Here a few shots from my brief visit.  I’ll be back soon to do a full shoot for Hamilton County Tourism, so I’ll be sure share those later this winter.

The woodworker is Christian Werner, a master craftsman from the small town of Seiffen, Germany. He travelled to Carmel for the opening weekend in 2017 to demonstrate how he creates animal figurines.

Carmel Indiana Christkindlmarkt Ice Skating

If you’re looking for more recent images from Carmel Christkindlmarkt, you’ll want to join our mailing list because we shared an exclusive view of the gorgeous Glühwein Pyramid, added in 2018, and a mouth watering image of a Raclette with our newsletter and we’ll be sure to let you know when those images go live in the future.

2018 Holiday Events

As legendary Hoosier Michael Jackson once said, “Don’t stop ’til you get enough.”  So by all means, please enjoy our other Indianapolis holiday events posts from 2018.  Click the image below.

indianapolis holiday photography

Carmel Artomobilia

2017 Carmel Artomobilia

I try to get out every year to check out Carmel Artomobilia.  The crowd was huge this year!  I always take my kids with me, so navigating four little-ones through a crowd and making sure they’re not climbing into cars tends to limit the number of shots that I take.  I’m happy with the selects, though.

2017 Carmel Artomobilia Porsche

When shooting at car shows, I embrace the crowds and the shooting conditions.  That’s why you’ll see a lot of people in my photos (I don’t look to get wide shots of entire cars) and a lot of detail shots. I also look to incorporate the surroundings, so you can see how the cars look within the environment of a specific show.

2017 Carmel Artomobilia Ferrari
2017 Carmel Artomobilia Ferrari
2017 Carmel Artomobilia BMW

Let me know what you think in the comments below! What car are you wishing you could get a closer look at? Have you been to any good car shows lately?

2017 Carmel Artomobilia BMW
2017 Carmel Artomobilia Lotus

Carmel Artomobilia Related Content

Check out these posts for more cars & trucks. You can also learn more about Carmel Artomobilia on their website here.

carmel-artomobilia-2019
dream-cars

work-truck-ntea

Youth Baseball

Carmel Indiana Youth Baseball Westfield Grand Park

Here’s some documentary photography of a youth baseball team from Carmel, Indiana. These photos are taking at Grand Park, a massive 400-acre sports complex in Westfield.

Carmel Indiana Youth Baseball Westfield Grand Park

Baseball usually requires a really long lens to get any decent action, but with youth baseball, I can usually stand close enough to get some cool shots with my 70-200mm.

Carmel Indiana Youth Baseball Westfield Grand Park
Carmel Indiana Youth Baseball Westfield Grand Park

Another great thing about shooting baseball at the high school level and younger is that everyone is fine with me shooting in the dugout and on the field. Getting physically closer to the subjects and using a wide-angle lens really brings the viewer into the frame.

Carmel Indiana Youth Baseball Westfield Grand Park
Carmel Indiana Youth Baseball Westfield Grand Park
Carmel Indiana Youth Baseball Westfield Grand Park
Carmel Indiana Youth Baseball Westfield Grand Park

On the field these kids look like mini professional baseball players. But once they’re off, they’re just regular kids again. I like the image below for this reason.

Carmel Indiana Youth Baseball Westfield Grand Park
Carmel Indiana Youth Baseball Westfield Grand Park

Personal Legend Project: Deacon Bill Reid

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Deacon Bill Reid, St. Elizabeth Seton Catholic Church

Deacon Bill spent 31 years working at Eli Lilly.  As retirement approached, he began to consider his next chapter.  His sister mentioned that she thought he’d make a great deacon, and he admitted that he didn’t know exactly what a deacon’s role was.  As he learned about the diaconate, he began to think that it could be a great fit for him.  At first, he told me, he thought that becoming a deacon might be as simple as receiving a blessing from a priest.  However, the actual path required seven years of schooling.

Bill Reid officially became Deacon Bill Reid in 2008.  He likes to say that he’s not “retired” he’s “rewired.”  Well put.  His enthusiasm for his role in the church was immediately evident when my wife and I had first attended his baptism class in 2009.  As a deacon, he performs baptisms, and he has baptized two of our children.  I had hoped to photograph him at a baptism, as that’s one of his favorite roles in the church, but alas, he was not scheduled for one in April.  I opted to take the photos at  Vespers (evening prayers), which I think made for a great second choice.  Deacon Bill enjoys the rituals of the Catholic Church and I think these images capture that.

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The following set of six questions will be answered by each of the subjects.

1)  Some people call it a “true calling” or their “life’s work.”  In the book The Alchemist, author Paulo Coelho calls it your Personal Legend. What do you consider to be your true calling, or Personal Legend?

Following God’s call is challenging, difficult, and highly rewarding. My true calling is to be a visible sign of God’s love to everyone – not just members of my family, not just members of my parish, not just to people whom I like – but to everyone I come in contact with.

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2)  When did you first realize that this was your calling?

I think I’ve known this is my calling for my whole adult life, but it became very clear to me when I considered retirement from the business world, and wondered what I would do next. One of my early bosses gave me good advice when I was quite young, right out of college; he said “You have to retire to, you can’t just retire from. That way you’ll have something that will engage you for the rest of your life, and you won’t just waste away doing nothing.” I remembered that advice and followed it when I considered retirement.

My sister was the first to suggest that I consider becoming a Deacon, and that thought kept coming back to me over and over again as I prayed and discussed the idea with my wife.

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3)  People often become completely engrossed, losing track of time or outside concerns while performing tasks related to their calling.  This might be referred to as being “in the zone” or “flow.”  When do you experience this most often?

I lose track of time when I am engaged in a serious conversation with someone who is struggling, either with their faith, or with an important life situation they find themselves in. In those times of personal crisis, I look for opportunities to help them live through the crisis, and for me time just stands completely still.

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4)  What is the greatest challenge or obstacle you’ve faced in pursuit of your life’s work?

The hardest thing to manage or control is time! Every one of us gets the same amount of time every day, no matter what our occupation. Throughout the day I’m asked to spend time with my family, and with church-related activities. As a husband and father and grandfather along with being a deacon, there just aren’t enough minutes in the day to satisfy everyone. Balancing all these priorities is a real challenge!

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5)  What has pursuing your Personal Legend taught you?

It has taught me that I have been blessed in many ways throughout my life, in my successes and in my failures. I’ve learned more from my mistakes than from my successes. I continue to seek God every day, and I find Him in the most amazing places.

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6)  What piece of advice can you offer to others seeking their true calling?

Even though it sounds cheesy, you need to follow your heart! Deep within you lurks your true calling, even if you are not pursuing it at the present time. If you take time to pray quietly, to seek and follow the advice of good friends, and to be honest with yourself about your skills and abilities, you may be lucky enough to discover what your true calling is. It can take most of a lifetime to find it. Once you’ve found it, follow it!

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Are you following your Personal Legend?  Tell us about it in the comments below.

Subscribe to the blog, or add us to your RSS feed to follow along as we post a new set of images each day for the next 30 days.   For background on this project, check out our first post in the series.

Personal Legend Project: Tommy Baldwin

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Tommy Baldwin, Musician

I met Tommy in a very serendipitous manner.  I stopped by my office on Saturday after another shoot and noticed my office neighbors, Kingston’s Music Showcase, were in.  For me, music is as big of a passion as photography, and I hadn’t yet found a musician to participate in the project.  I thought I’d ask the owner, Rick Kingston, if he could recommend someone.  Without hesitation he said that Tommy Baldwin was the most passionate musician he knew, and he would be coming by in about 15 minutes.  Tommy is a 20-year-old phenom who splits his time between his hometown of Indy and LA, gigging with big names in the blues & rock scene.

When Tommy came in, he was immediately on board with the project.  I shot a few images during rehearsal, then met up later in the evening for his gig at Vireli’s.  If you’re in the Indy area, mark July 3rd on the calendar and come see Tommy’s inspired playing at Guitar-mel Fest, a concert at CarmelFest, which I’ll be sponsoring/shooting again this year.

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Here’s where we typically have our six questions, but today we’re presenting Tommy’s info in more of a story format.

I believe my true calling is to write and play music. I love the arts in its entirety. Drawings, Paintings, Pottery, Glass, Acting, Music, Film, etc, but music is my favorite of them all. It’s my favorite because you can still feel it when you close your eyes. It’s the melody you think of walking down the street or hanging out with friends. It’s all around you, all the time. You just have to listen, and create what you hear and make it your own.

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I started playing guitar when I was 8 years old. I went to my friend’s house who had a broken guitar with 3 strings on it and barely worked. I remember when I first picked it up and played it on my lap like a lap steel guitar, but I used my thumb. He saw I was really interested in it so he let me have it and take it home.  When I took it home I had no idea how to play it, but I loved it.  I remember waking up the next day to find out my dad had tuned it and I was so mad because I liked how it sounded before…. Haha.  

A year later Santa brought me my first Squire Stratocaster.  So I learned how to properly play it, learning chords and songs.  I loved that damn thing, then, a year later my dad and mom surprised me with a Red Epiphone SG.  I got that guitar as an early Christmas present, I was so excited. A month later on December 19th, 2006 my dad died of a heart attack. My life completely changed. That event morphed me into who I am as a person today; how passionate I am about music, and how I love my friends and family.

My mom and I moved in February of 2007 into a little condo and had to get rid of a lot of our stuff from the old house.  We were extremely sad, but we made it through.  At the time I loved to play Metallica and Linkin Park. But, when I heard Stevie Ray Vaughan’s version of Voodoo Child by Jimi Hendrix, I watched in awe and said, “Now that’s how I wanna play guitar!”  I could feel the blues; the notes that he felt and sang with his guitar and vocals.  Then I heard Hendrix, Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, Peter Frampton, and I was SO in love with the blues…. And I still am! That’s what I still play.

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Fast forward to now… Last year I met Dug Pinnick from King’s X at the National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show. I was there to see one of my favorite guitar players, Eric Gales. After his show, he went off to the side and signed CD’s.  Eric did a project with Dug called PGP with a drummer named Thomas Pridgen, who my drummer Elijah Polard loves. He showed me the group.

So I saw Dug and said well screw this line, I’m gonna go say hi to him, because he’s a badass bass player. So I walked up to him and introduced myself and said how much I loved his tone and style of playing. He asked me why I was here and said I love Eric Gales and would love to meet him and buy a CD. So he grabbed my hand and said, “Well screw this line he’s my friend!” and walked me through the line and introduced me as Tommy Baldwin, his blues guitar player friend, when we had just met. Eric gave me a hug and said “Hey man, nice to meet you!” and signed CDs for us.

Then Dug offered to take us to dinner!  So we went and ate in the restaurant of the Hilton and sat and laughed and conversed for about 2 hours.  Then Dug said come up to the room and hang with us if you’d like.  So we went and hung for about an hour or so and called it a night, but as we were leaving Dug says, “I’ll see you tomorrow, buddy!”

That was the first day and night I met my best friend in the whole world, Dug Pinnick.  Now, a little over a year later, I live with Dug in North Hollywood California (Encino/Reseda area).  He’s taken me on tour with him twice, in which he got me up to play the encore song every night on for a month, which was Voodoo Child by Jimi Hendrix.  I’ve also now played with and met so many famous musicians who I now can call my friends and work with as well.  Now Dug is playing bass and producing my upcoming record “Moving Towards The West Coast Sun”, and we are due to release it with Rat Pak records in the summer time.

I’ve worked very hard this past year writing and recording music with Dug and can’t wait to get back out to Los Angeles to finish up the record and see what the rest of 2016 brings. I thank God for all of this happening. God works in very strange ways, and I am so thankful for everything going on right now and all of the people that are helping it happen. It is a blessing to meet and befriend people on this path to hopefully achieve my true calling.

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Are you following your Personal Legend?  Tell us about it in the comments below.

Subscribe to the blog, or add us to your RSS feed to follow along as we post a new set of images each day for the next 30 days.   For background on this project, check out our first post in the series.

Personal Legend Project: Intro

ascent

Project Statement

A couple years ago, the book The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho kept showing up on my radar.  After hearing about it several times in just a few months, I thought it must be time to read it.

The Alchemist is an allegory about a Spanish shepherd named Santiago who dreams of treasure at the Pyramids and leaves his comfortable life to pursue his destiny.  Sometimes referred to as a calling, vocation, or life’s purpose, Coelho’s character, the king of Salem, calls it a Personal Legend.  “It’s what you’ve always wanted to accomplish,” he says. “Whoever you are, or whatever it is that you do, when you really want something, it’s because that desire originated in the soul of the universe. It’s your mission on earth.”

My Personal Legend is tied to my photography.  I seek to document life in order to build empathy and understanding among people because, despite surface differences, I believe we all share basic desires for love and a sense of purpose.

In working towards my Personal Legend, I have become interested in documenting people who are living theirs.  After first having this idea, I pushed it to the background as the pursuit of personal work felt frivolous when faced with the obligations of every day life.  However, as the king says, “To realize one’s Personal Legend is a person’s only real obligation.”  When living your Personal Legend, all the other pieces will fall into place.

I’ve decided it’s time to move my Personal Legend along with a new project: photographing a new person every day for 30 days who is following their Personal Legend.  April 2016 is a great time to start.  It marks the beginning of my 35th year.  It leads into the arrival of my fourth child in May.  In thinking about fatherhood, I feel the best thing I can offer is to teach my children to be fully themselves and live their own Personal Legends by doing so myself.

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Me on day 1 of this project: April 1, 2016

The following set of six questions will be answered by each of the subjects.  I figured that since I’m asking this of others, it only made sense for me to do it myself.

1)  Some people call it a “true calling” or their “life’s work.”  In the book The Alchemist, author Paulo Coelho calls it your Personal Legend. What do you consider to be your true calling, or Personal Legend?

To put it broadly, I want to be a unifier.  The purpose of my work is to bring people together.  I want viewers to see my photos and gain an understanding, both of the subjects and of themselves. I feel that building empathy in this way can help to connect people who might never cross paths physically.

2)  When did you first realize that this was your calling?

I first realized I could use a camera to communicate on an 8th grade trip to Washington D.C.  I remember feeling a sense of connection to my surroundings when framing images through the viewfinder.  

As I paid more attention to photography in high school, I felt a greater understanding of current and historical events through photojournalism and documentary photography.  Being able to experience a moment at the same time as a photograph’s subject was much more powerful to me than any second or third-hand account I had ever heard or read.  I knew I wanted to create powerful imagery as well.

3)  People often become completely engrossed, losing track of time or outside concerns while performing tasks related to their calling.  This might be referred to as being “in the zone” or “flow.”  When do you experience this most often?

When I’m shooting.  I quiet my thoughts and react to what’s happening around me.  I like to experience the flow of my surroundings.  When things are loud and busy I find myself moving around a lot, becoming part of the activity.  When I’m in a quiet and peaceful space, I react by moving calmly and taking photos sparingly so as not to disturb the mood.

4)  What is the greatest challenge or obstacle you’ve faced in pursuit of your life’s work?

In order to pursue my photography as a career, instead of as a hobby, I’ve had to learn a business mindset.  This is something that wasn’t initially in my nature, but I’ve learned to look at it as another creative endeavor and that makes it much more interesting and engaging.

I used to think of “business” as a negative term.  In the naivety of my college years, I thought people who studied business were simply interested in money for the sake of money.  Fortunately, I got a little wiser.  Or maybe it was because I married a business major.  Either way, I’ve learned that knowing how to run a business is about supporting yourself and your family and giving you the means to pursue your life’s work.

5)  What has pursuing your Personal Legend taught you?

What I’m learning through my Personal Legend is how to be more present in all aspects of my life.  When I can take the way that I feel “in the zone” while creating images, and bring it to my personal life, it makes me a better husband, father and friend.  When I’m completely present with the people around me, it brings each of us more fulfillment.

6)  What piece of advice can you offer to others seeking their true calling?

The longer you wait, the harder it is to start, but it’s never impossible.  As the excuses pile up, the reasons to not pursue your calling seemingly outnumber the reasons to try.  But really there is only one reason to try: It’s your life’s purpose.  And that one reason outweighs all others.  
 
Pick one goal to start.  Something that feels scary and a stretch, but just do it.  That’s what I decided to do with this project.  30 people in 30 days.  It’s a ton of work and there was a fear of failure present as I started asking people to participate, but I know that this is the right thing. In 10 days this idea has gone from conception to the first shoot day, today.  There are currently 21 people on board with another 20 potential subjects.  
 
When I finish these 30 days of this project it will lead to the next step, but until then, I can’t know what that next step is.  If nothing else, I will have met a lot of new interesting and exciting people and strengthened ties with a number of amazing people I already knew.


Are you following your Personal Legend?  Tell us about it in the comments below.

Subscribe to the blog, or add us to your RSS feed to follow along as I post a new set of images each day for the next 30 days.

Progress

I’m not sure what I was looking for when I left my office in the middle of the afternoon to go take photos.  Typically, I avoid shooting in the middle of the day because of the harsh light, but I was feeling anxious after sitting at my desk for hours and thought I’d try to work with it.

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I had a very symmetrical version of this photo with no vehicles, but I was drawn to this version with the dump truck. Special thanks to the driver for not smacking me in the head with his mirror.
I had a very symmetrical version of this photo with no vehicles, but I was drawn to this version with the dump truck. Special thanks to the driver for not smacking me in the head with his mirror.

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This construction is at the site where I took photos of the land being cleared in April. Moving fast!

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The rubble and steeple had similar shapes. I found it interesting.

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Waiting to join up with new pavement.

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The restaurant owner was curious of my motives for taking photos of his business, but I didn’t have any. It’s been a while since someone was suspicious of me taking photos. I kind of missed it!

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New neighborhood meets old neighborhood.

CarmelFest

CarmelFest is a big Independence Day celebration held every year on July 3rd & 4th in Carmel, Indiana.  Since 2012, I’ve participated in the event as a sponsor and “official photographer”. I enjoy living in a smaller city where I get to see so many people I know celebrating our country together as a community.  It’s also nice to have a shoot where I can drink beer and eat fried dough and it isn’t frowned upon.

Every color, race, religion and orientation is welcome in the United States. And that’s a lot of what makes it a fantastic place to live. As descendants of immigrants, our household proudly celebrates this heritage. I love this theme of diversity in America so much that we created a slideshow to celebrate it. You can see it here.

One of my favorite aspects of shooting festivals & fairs like CarmelFest are the common themes of: joy with family and friends, a sense of community, service, respect for veterans, the enthusiasm of children, and the bonding qualities of music and food.  And don’t forget about some good ol’ fashioned American entrepreneurship!

And let’s not forget fireworks…Fireworks are tricky to shoot, which you probably know if you’ve ever tried to get a decent image of them in action. Maybe in the future, I’ll pull together a “how to shoot” fireworks post. In the meantime, I hope you’ll enjoy mine.

If you’re in the sharing spirit, send this post along to some friends & family. And we’d love to hear about your favorite July 4th memories in the comments below! Prints for these events are available in our shop and we always share 20% of the proceeds for prints with a partner charity.

Want more photos celebrating America? View these additional posts…

Refugees in Indiana

<Happy Birthday America>

<Fairs & Festivals of Indiana>