Angola Wire

made in america industrial welding and manufacturing

Earlier this year I headed up to northern Indiana to visit Angola Wire, a company that makes wire displays for retail use and custom wire parts. Shooting photos of industrial work and heavy machinery is always a fun task. And when sparks are flying, it makes for some cool images.

I spent a half-day wandering the floor on foot or riding in lifts for a high-angle perspective of people and robots working side-by-side. I was happy with the variety of images I was able to capture in a short amount of time. To give some perspective of how much I shot in 5 hours, this post contains only about 20% of the final images I turned over to the client.

Contact me today to find out more about how my documentary approach to would work for your business.

made in america industrial welding and manufacturing
made in america industrial welding and manufacturing
made in america industrial welding and manufacturing
made in america industrial welding and manufacturing
made in america industrial welding and manufacturing
made in america industrial welding and manufacturing
made in america industrial welding and manufacturing
angola wire manufacturing indiana
angola wire manufacturing indiana

Related Content

Here’s some more people making, building, cutting, assembling and whatnot.

Pork Chomps!

29_plaid_2028

Recently I had the opportunity to work with The Plaid Agency on a spot for Pork Chomps, a raw-hide free dog chew, with everyone’s favorite animal expert Jack Hanna.

Taking stills on a video shoot is always an interesting endeavor.  First off, the crew is always much larger than on a still shoot.  There’s a lot more navigating tight spaces.

Having grips present to light the whole scene takes some of the pressure off finding the best lighting, but there are other tasks that become more challenging.  Communication on these shoots is key.

06_plaid_2869

I speak with the Creative Director of the ad agency to get info on how the images will complement the video, along with where they’ll be used and what they need to convey.

I talk to the director to see what angles they’re shooting with which lenses and whether I’ll need to shoot simultaneously with the video, or jump in between takes to get the stills separately.

If I do need to jump in between scenes, I always have to pay close attention and speak up when it’s my turn because the video crew is on a tight schedule and they’re not thinking about what I need.  Understandably.  That’s my job, not theirs.  They have enough to manage.

I also communicate with the sound guy to see when critical audio is being recorded and whether the shutter click on the camera might interfere.

24_plaid_2945

I’ve worked with Richmarc Productions a number of times over the years.  Rick and Joyce are always friendly and professional, getting the job done quickly and efficiently while always maintaining a high level of quality.  It’s always enjoyable to see the final cut.  Here is a link to their 30-second spot on YouTube.